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Table 2 Summary of RCTs using herbal medicines for tic disorders

From: Herbal medicines for treating tic disorders: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials

Author (year) Sample size Interventions (regimen) Control (regimen) Outcomes Intergroup differences Adverse events
Conditions
Age (years)
Diagnosis criteria
Wu et al. (2009) [14] 81 (A) QZR (decoction, 200 ml daily for 24 wks, n = 40) (B) Haloperidol and trihexyphenidyl (50 μg/kg, n = 41) (1) YGTSS Score (1) MD −20.73 [−21.8, –19.66], P < 0.05 (A) Loss of appetite
Children with tic disorder
8–10
66/15
DSM-IV criteria
(2) Effective rate (2) RR 1.72[1.32, 2.25], P < 0.05 (B) Weight gain and drowsiness
Wu et al. (2010) [15] 61 (A) QZR (decoction, 200 ml daily for 24 wks, n = 31) (B) Haloperidol and trihexyphenidyl (50 μg/kg, n =30) (1) YGTSS Score (1) MD −15.9 [−17.31, −14.49], P < 0.05 (A) Loss of appetite
Children with tic disorder
51/10
DSM-IV criteria
(2) Effective rate (2) RR 1.65[1.23, 2.21], P < 0.05 (B) Weight gain and drowsiness
Zhao et al. (2010) [16] 64 (A) ND (granule capsule, 1 g daily for 8 wks, n = 33) (B) Placebo (n = 31) (1) YGTSS Score (1) MD −6.52 [−9.8, –3.24], P < 0.001 (A) Loss of appetite, constipation
(2) Effective rate (2) RR4.3 [ 1.68, 11.0], P < 0.001 (B) None
Children with Tourette’s syndrome
7–18
57/7
DSM-IV criteria
Li et al. (2009) [17] 90 (A) ND (granules, 3–9 g daily for 24 wks, n = 60), plus (B) (B) Haloperidol (2–6 mg, n = 30) (1) YGTSS Score (1) MD −4.35 [−7.34, –1.36], P < 0.01 (A) and (B) Drowsiness, lassitude, poor appetite
Children with Tourette’s syndrome
(2) Effective rate (2) RR1.3 [ 1.04, 1.62], P < 0.01
6–13
70/20
DSM-IV criteria